‘Spell for Safety’ poem in Origins + Robots Speak Back!: Asian American Speculative Poetry reading FRI/APR 20/11a-12:30p @ Split This Rock Poetry Festival

April 20, 2018

Asked to write a poem for Lavender Graduation last semester, I wrote “Spell for Safety” for the trans & genderqueer students who made it to the finish line. Thank you to Origins Literary Journal for giving it a home in the Split This Rock edition! & check out poems by lovelies Ashley M. JonesSham E-Ali NayeemApril GibsonRachelle CruzSahar Muradi & more!

http://www.originsjournal.com/split-this-rock-and-origins-journal-special-issue/2018/4/18/bvompfo8wu6ahid1hrhpq3pqt7olwk

***

I’ll be reading speculative poems & writing/dreaming towards a more equitable world with Rachelle CruzSally Wen Mao & lo kwa mei-en FRI/APRIL 20, 11a-12:30p @ Robots Speak Back!: Asian American Speculative Poetry reading during Split This Rock Poetry Festival: 2018! We’ll be in National Housing Center Room B – 1201 15th Street NW, Washington DC. Come join us!

 

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Montreal: The Arts of Trans, Gender Diverse & Two-Spirit Lives Conference (April 6, 2018)

April 6, 2018

Arts-of-Trans-Lives-POSTER[1]

Montreal friendlies! I’ll be presenting on the Archives & Sketches panel on ‘recombinant’ & speculative poetics, 11:20-12:15p @ The Arts of Trans, Gender Diverse, & Two-Spirit Lives Conference (Thompson House Ballroom, 3650 McTavish St). This conference is free & open to all (no registration necessary).

This conference is part of a series of events organized by the Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at McGill University, Montreal, dedicated to exploring tactics of survival, resistance and resilience in the lives of trans, gender diverse and Two-Spirit people. This three-day conference will examine creative living through engagement with art, media and culture, as well as the creativity of survival tactics that make life more liveable for trans people. Art isn’t just objects or content, but a way to think about how to reanimate and open material, sensory and perceptual conditions of existence to more sustaining ends. It names the creative ways that trans, gender diverse and Two-Spirit people navigate the art of living. Rooted in the local, this event also aims to share international (and intergenerational) perspectives.

At a moment where trans, gender diverse and Two-Spirit lives are, in some ways, more visible than ever, silencing, erasures, circumscription and marginalization continues and even intensifies. In Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility, editors Gossett, Stanley and Burton describe the trap of visibility as politically and existentially problematic, a lure that promises social legitimacy but only within pre-scribed positions that fail to accommodate the multiple experiences of trans, gender diverse and Two-Spirit lives. How have trans people, through artistic, critical and activist practices, articulated non-hegemonic ways to talk about, practice, research, engage and value art, media and representation, in ways that can both address this bind, and acknowledge the world-making challenges such work can propose? What needs to change in critical discourse, pedagogy, curation and criticism to be in conversation with these questions? How might work not simply be invested in a politics of visibility, but in the claims of lived experiences of precarity, danger, colonization, fragility alongside forms of resourcefulness, support, imagination and survival that trans, gender-diverse and Two-Spirit people employ to endure and thrive, in art practice, but also in everyday life? Paul Preciado, author of Testo Junkie, described his recent curatorial work around performance and media arts at Documenta 2017 in terms of a move away from representative politics towards a “Parliament of Bodies”, noting that “the world is transitioning, but our institutions resist this transition. The museum, the school, the hospital need to transition.” What kind of work is already happening and yet to be done to take up this challenge?
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For the full conference schedule, please visit: https://mcgill.ca/igsf/events/igsfconference2018/schedule-horaire

Toronto Queer & Trans Asian Poetics (3.15) & NYC Segue Foundation (3.17) Readings!

March 15, 2018
UPCOMING READINGS
Hope to see some of you lovelies!
xo,

Ching-In

 

1. Toronto Queer & Trans Asian Poetics (Thurs, March 15, 6:30-8p, Glad Day Bookshop, ) https://www.facebook.com/events/173731206585281/
Join us for readings by local authors Trish Salah and Tom Cho, and US-based authors Margaret Rhee and Ching-In Chen! A night of poetry, art and literature celebrating the queer and trans Asian diaspora. With Trish Salah and Tom Cho, this event also celebrates the publications of Ching-In Chen’s recombinant, and Margaret Rhee’s Love, Robot, and brings collective queer and trans voices together to imagine otherwise.
Hosted by Loretta Mui

// BIOS //

TRISH SALAH

Born in Halifax, Trish Salah is the author of the Lambda Award-winning poetry collection, Wanting in Arabic, and of Lyric Sexology, Vol. 1, as well as co-editor of a special issue of TSQ on Transgender Cultural Production. She is a member of the editorial boards for Eoagh, Topia and TSQ. Her writing is available in recent and forthcoming issues of Angelaki, Anomaly, Somatechnics, and Supplement. She is currently assistant professor of Gender Studies at Queen’s University, Kingston.

TOM CHO

Tom Cho’s current project is a novel about the meaning of life. His full-length debut was the collection of fictions Look Who’s Morphing, published in North America by Arsenal Pulp Press and originally published in his birth country of Australia. Look Who’s Morphing was shortlisted for multiple awards, including the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book. Tom also has over 70 publications of fiction pieces in magazines and anthologies such as The Best Australian Stories series, PRISM International, Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading, and others. tomcho.com

CHING-IN CHEN

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017). They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundations writing communities. Chen is also the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011; AK Press 2016) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing, and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. A poetry editor of the Texas Review, they currently teach creative writing at Sam Houston State University. www.chinginchen.com

MARGARET RHEE

Margaret Rhee is a poet, artist, and scholar. She is the author of chapbooks Yellow (Tinfish Press, 2011) and Radio Heart; or, How Robots Fall Out of Love (Finishing Line Press, 2015), nominated for a 2017 Elgin Award, Science Fiction Poetry Association, and Love, Robot (The Operating System, 2017) named a 2017 Best Book of Poetry by Entropy Magazine. Her project The Kimchi Poetry Machine was selected for the Electronic Literature Collection Volume 3. She received her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in ethnic and new media studies. Currently, she is a Visiting Scholar at the NYU A/P/A Institute, and a Visiting Assistant Professor at SUNY Buffalo in the Department of Media Study.

LORETTA MUI

Loretta Mui is a second-generation chinese australian comic artist and youth worker. She self-publishes the comic Dreams of Loss & Transformation and will be debuting her new comic Sweat & Tears at this year’s TCAF.https://www.instagram.com/loretta.miauw/

// ACCESSIBILITY //

The venue is wheelchair accessible, with an all genders washroom on the main floor. Note, however, that this washroom does not have an e-button for exit, washroom grab bars, and confirmation of the ability for a wheelchair user to slide under the vanity to use the sink, soap, and towel. Please refrain from wearing scents. The nearest subway is Wellesley. Street parking and Green P parking are on Wellesley Street.

// LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT //

Glad Day Bookshop is on the traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishnaabe and the Wendat. We acknowledge them and any other Nations who care for the land (acknowledged and unacknowledged, recorded and unrecorded) as the past, present and future caretakers of this land.

2. NYC Segue Reading Series with El Roy Red (Sat, March 17, 5-6:30p, Zinc Bar, 82 W 3rd St, New York, NY) https://www.facebook.com/events/182047299248242/
http://seguefoundation.com/calendar.htm
Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi Books, 2009) & recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017). A Kundiman & Lambda Fellow, they belong to Macondo & Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundations. Chen is co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home (South End Press, 2011) & poetry editor of Texas Review.

El Roy Red works in the space btwn hope & efficacy until they reach actualization. Galvanized in Black/Brown queer liberation, Red utilizes writing, movement, ritual, & performance to facilitate healing, growth, & alternative futures. #postafrofuturism. Their poems can be found in Apogee Journal & Hand Job Zine.

Doors 4.30 p.m., readings 5 p.m.

The venue is located down one flight of stairs. We apologize that the venue is not wheelchair accessible. There are two non-gender-segregated bathrooms on the main floor. Note, however, that these do not have an e-button for exit, nor washroom grab bars. Please refrain from wearing scents. The nearest subway is West Fourth Street–Washington Square. Street parking is available on West 3rd Street. There is a cash-only $5 entrance fee, which goes to readers.

My AWP 2018 Schedule

March 7, 2018

Wednesday, March 7, 2018:

7-9p Kelsey Street Press & Keep St. Pete Lit: Centenarian Vision @ Tampa Bay History Center, 801 Old Water St (with Eleanor Eichenbaum, Fred Hearns, Tenea Johnson, Gloria Muñoz, Paul Wilborn, Amber DiPietra & Sabrina Dalla Valle)

https://www.facebook.com/events/189544978290494/

Thursday, March 8, 2018:

9-10:15a Gender Outlaws: Teaching Gender Identity in Creative Writing Panel @ Rm 22, Tampa Convention Center, 1st Fl (with Jody Keisner, Meg Day & Misha Rai)

10:30-11:30a Red Hen Press signing @ Table #1123 @ Book Fair

7-10p Defending Home: An Eco-Inclusive Reading @ The Hideaway, 1120 E. Kennedy Blvd (with Joe Wilkins, Marco Wilkinson, Ben Rutherfurd, Molly Reid, Rosalie Moffett, Aviva Kasowski, Steven Kleinman, Matty Layne Glasgow, Nathan Gehoski, Shamala Gallagher, Nathan Dixon, Michael Copperman, Jennifer S. Cheng, Tamiko Beyer)

https://www.facebook.com/events/1661670380588008/

Friday, March 9, 2018:

3-4:15p Erasures, White Shame: We Need to Talk Panel @ Rm 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, 1st Fl (with Natalia Treviño, Rita Dove, Wendy Barker, Leanne Howe)

7-9p Reading Queer: Poetry in a Time of Chaos @ The Portico, 1001 N Florida Ave (with Bryan Borland, Cathleen Chambless, Gregg Shapiro, Jan Becker, Jericho Brown, J.P. Howard, Ruben Quesada, Sam Sax, Samiya Bashir, Shane Allison & Valerie Wetlaufer)

https://www.facebook.com/events/527051214344711/

Saturday, March 10, 2018:

12-12:30p Reading Queer anthology signing @ Anhinga Press Table #1602 @ Book Fair

9:30-11:30p Literaoke at AWP @ Lector’s POP UP Space, above The Hub, 715 N. Franklin

(with Samiya Bashir, Doug Brown, Ramy El-Etreby, Mira Jacob, Lillian Li, Jason Mccall, Rajiv Mohabir, Yesenia Montilla, Sally Wen Mao, Faisal Mohyuddin, Cynthia Dewi Oka, Dianca London, Soham Patel, Natalie Scenters-Zapico, Danny Thanh Nguyen)

https://www.facebook.com/events/196137841137617/

All Weekend: Sam Houston State MFA/Texas Review Table #751 @ Book Fair

Failure to Con/Form: Story Circle ~ Círculo de historias March 1

March 1, 2018

ftc image

+++ La invitación en español sigue abajo. +++

Failure to Con/Form Story Circle

Trans, nonbinary, intersex &/or gender-non-conforming? Please join Failure to Con/Form, in collaboration with LHI, on March 1, 2018 at The Montrose Center from 6-9 pm for our kickoff story circle!

Failure to Con/Form is an ad-hoc group of trans, genderqueer & gender-non-conforming writers, performers & artists sponsoring a rotating flash-mob reading/performance series in local sites of restriction & healing/safety dedicated to featuring local & nationally recognized trans, genderqueer, intersex & gender-non-conforming writers, performers & artists. This reading/performance series is inspired by the history of LGBTQI* community members who have performed queer takeovers or disruptions of non-queer-friendly spaces such as bars, clubs, proms & Baptist conventions.

We are planning two performances to take place in spring & fall 2018. Each performance will take place over the course of one day & incorporate one site of restriction with a flash-mob reading/performance & one site which will sponsor a healing &/or safety event with a site-specific installation.

As part of the planning process leading up to each performance, we will host a story circle for trans, genderqueer, intersex & gender-non-conforming community members to share stories and nominate sites in which they have experienced restriction as well as sites which have provided spaces of healing &/or safety in Houston, Texas. In addition to community building, we hope to generate stories &/or other material for writers, performers & artists to work with as well as nominate possible sites. Story circles will be bilingual in English and in Spanish to include the two most-frequently used languages in the local trans community.

We will provide refreshments and beverages as part of the Story Circle, including vegan and gluten-free options.

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION:
The space is accessible to wheelchair users.

To provide a chemical & fragrance free event, we request that participants not smoke before or during the event & not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event.

This event is intended to be age-inclusive–children are welcome, but young children will need to be managed by their own caretakers.

More info? Check out https://failuretoconformhouston.wordpress.com/

This project is made possible with the support from The Idea Fund. The Idea Fund is a re-granting program administered by DiverseWorks, Aurora Picture Show, & Project Row Houses & funded by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Questions? Please contact at:

Ching-In Chen (English) – chinginchen@gmail.com
John Pluecker (español) – plujo7@gmail.com
~~~
Círculo de historia para Failure to Con/Form

¿Eres trans, intersexo o una persona de género no-binaria o no-conforme? Por favor acompaña a Failure to Con/Form (Aversión al conformismo) en nuestro círculo de historias inaugural el 1 de marzo, 2018 en el Montrose Center de 6-9pm en colaboración con LHI.

Failure to Con/Form es un grupo ad-hoc de escritorxs, artistas y performancerxs trans, genderqueer y de género no-conforme. Estamos planeando una serie de lecturas y performance tipo flash-mob en sitios de restricción y de sanación/seguridad al nivel local en Houston. En estos eventos, habrá escritorxs, performancerxs y artistas trans, genderqueer, intersexo y de género no-conforme tanto locales como nacionales. Esta serie de lecturas y performance se inspira en la historia de miembrxs de la comunidad LGBTQI* que han hecho ocupaciones y disrupciones queer de sitios que no han apoyado o incluido personas queer, tales como bares, antros, bailes y convenciones bautistas.

Estamos planeando dos eventos que se van a llevar a cabo en la primavera y en el otoño del 2018. Cada performance se llevará a cabo a lo largo de un día y va a incorporar un sitio de restricción y un sitio donde habrá eventos de curación y de seguridad con una instalación diseñada para ese espacio.

Como parte del proceso de planeación antes de cada performance, vamos a armar un Círculo de Historias para que los miembros de la comunidad trans, genderqueer, intersexo y de género no-conforme compartan sus historias y nominen lugares en los cuales han experimentado restricción así como aquellos que han proporcionado espacios de sanación y/o seguridad en Houston, Texas. Además de construir un sentido de comunidad, esperamos generar historias y/u otro material de utilidad para escritorxs, performancerxs y artistas, así como nominar posibles sitios. Estos círculos de historias serán bilingües para ser inclusivos con el inglés y el español, los dos idiomas más utilizados por la comunidad trans de la localidad.

Se proveerá de refrigerios y bebidas como parte del Círculo de Historias, incluyendo opciones veganas y sin gluten.

INFORMACIÓN DE ACCESIBILIDAD:
El espacio ofrece acceso a los usuarios de sillas de ruedas.

Para crear un evento libre de químicos y fragancias, pedimos a los participantes no fumar antes o después del evento y no usar colonias, perfumes o cualquier otra esencia o producto químico para el evento.

Este evento pretende ser inclusivo, lxs niñxs son bienvenidxs, pero lxs niñxs pequeñxs necesitan ser monitoreadxs por sus guardianes.

Si deseas más información, consulta://failuretoconformhouston.wordpress.com/

Este proyecto ha sido posible con el apoyo de The Idea Fund. The Idea Fund es un programa de re-patrocinamiento administrado por DiverseWorks, Aurora Picture Show, Project Row Houses y patrocinado por The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

¿Tiene preguntas? Por favor contacte a:
Ching-In Chen (English) – chinginchen@gmail.com
John Pluecker (español) – plujo7@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/154010168653034/

LA Reading @ Otis College of Art & Design

February 7, 2018

LA/SoCal friendlies, I’ll be reading tonight @ 7:30p @ Otis College of Art and Design (9045 Lincoln Blvd) as part of the MFA Writing Program’s Visiting Writers Series. It’s free & open to the public! A big thanks to Marisa Matarazzo for organizing the reading & to Jen Hofer for recommending my work!

https://www.otis.edu/calendar/visiting-writers-series-ching-chen

Entropy Best of 2017 list, Dec 2 Public Poetry reading @ HPL Young Branch & Dec 14 Tintero & MFAH Around the Block reading!

December 2, 2017

A thank you to Janice Lee & Entropy for including ‘recombinant’ on this incredible list of Entropy‘s Best of 2017: Best Poetry Books & Poetry Collections list. 

Also, some upcoming readings!

Sat, December 2, 2p — Public Poetry Reading @ Houston Public Library, Young Branch (5107 Griggs Road) with Niki Herd, Erica Nicole, Henk Rossouw & Rj Wright

Thurs, December 14, 6-8p — Around the Block: A Night of Literary Voices @ Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Join the Museum of Fine Arts and Tintero Projects for a unique night of literary art!

Five Houston writers (Ching-In Chen, Corinna Delgado, Christopher Diaz, Icess Fernandez Rojas & Josh Inocéncio) present work inspired by the exhibition HOME—So Different, So Appealing. You’ll join the writers on a walk around the “neighborhoods” and “hogares” (homes) presented in the exhibition.

About Tintero Projects
Tintero Projects promotes writing and reading opportunities for emerging Latinx poets and writers of color in the Houston–Galveston/Gulf Coast Region, providing community through writing workshops, readings, collaborative art events, submission events, and a monthly reading series.

This program and access to the exhibion are free! On Thursdays, Museum admission is free, courtesy of Shell. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Related Program
Inspired by the exhibition “HOME—So Different, So Appealing” and community partner Tintero Projects, this collaboration brings another event, on December 7: Casa Mía: A Writing Workshop on “HOME.”

Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes in Austin (EAST Show) Nov 11-18, 2017

November 11, 2017

Austin friendlies! Some of my poetry has been made into broadsides as part of ‘Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes’ featuring Photographs by Sharon Beals & Literature on (Im)migration by Chaitali SenDena AfrasiabiMaria Reva, writers from Youth Rise Texas & me! This & next weekend, Saturday & Sunday, 11a-6pm, Prizer Arts & Letters, 2023 e. cesar chavez, austin! as part of the East Austin Studio Tour on Nov 11-18! Thanks to Abe Louise Young for organizing!

Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes (EAST Show)

https://www.facebook.com/events/126272001421468/

See international photographer Sharon Beals’ stunning photographs of birds’ nests and nests created by humans out of beach plastic–alongside moving prose and poetry by literary writers on the themes of immigration and migration: Chaitali SenChing-In ChenDena Afrasiabi and Maria Reva.

What are our human nests in a time of global change?

Play with found materials in our Creativity Room (shredded paper, feathers, buttons, fabric and more) to create a nest of your own.

Light refreshments and beverages served, open to all.

BIOS

Sharon Beals is a San Francisco Bay Area-based photographer concerned with the environment and natural habitat. She is the author of *Nests: Fifty Nests and the Birds that Built Them* (Chronicle Books, Spring 2011).

Chaitali Sen is the author of The Pathless Sky, published by Europa Editions in 2015. Born in India and raised in New York and Pennsylvania, she currently lives in Austin, Texas with her husband and stepson. FullSizeRender-4 copyHer short stories, reviews, and essays have appeared in New England Review, New Ohio Review, Colorado Review, Catapult, Brooklyn Magazine, The Aerogram, Los Angeles Review of Books, and other journals. She is a graduate of the Hunter College MFA program in Fiction.
www.chaitalisen.com

Dena Afrasiabi’s fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in The Toast, Fiction Southeast, JMWW and the anthology Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers (University of Arkansas Press). Her work has received fellowship support from the Millay Colony, The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. She’s also the co-founding editor of the journal Elsewhere Lit.
https://twitter.com/AfrasiabiDena

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017).They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundations writing communities. Chen is also the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011; AK Press 2016) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing, and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. They are a senior editor of The Conversant and poetry editor of the Texas Review. They currently teach creative writing at Sam Houston State University. www.chinginchen.com

Maria Reva was born in Ukraine and grew up in Vancouver, BC. Her stories have appeared in magazines such as The Atlantic and The New Quarterly, and have been anthologized in The Journey Prize Stories 29 and The Best American Short Stories 2017. She is a fiction fellow at the Michener Center for Writers, where she is at work on a linked story collection set in Soviet Ukraine.
www.mariareva.ca

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

November 7, 2017

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

Bayou City Rm 219, Student Center South @ University of Houston

https://www.facebook.com/events/146587129303753/

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION:
To provide a chemical and fragrance free event, we request that participants not smoke before or during the event and to not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event. Please read at the bottom for handicap accessibility information.

Roundtable-Reading on Houston-Based Feminist Poetics with Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz

In 1977, the year the IWY National Women’s Conference converged in Houston, Audre Lorde published her seminal essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” in which she posits that poetry “forms the quality of light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” For Lorde, poems are the precursor to activism, “the spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas.”

Forty year later, Houston is a uniquely fertile city for cross-pollination and conversation, especially in the arts and humanities, and particularly in our vibrant poetry communities. While painstaking progress has been made, the welfare of Texas women, nonbinary, and trans citizens are threatened by ongoing political tensions about “bathroom bills,” title IX, immigration, insurance, government grants, higher education curricula, and a dearth of diversity in the current federal administration.

This roundtable-reading reimagines the definition of civic engagement, establishing a place for the arts as a vital conduit for progressive policy, as imagined by Lorde. We’ll explore poetry’s thorny relationship with representation. To what extent does Houston’s position as a rapidly-developing Sunbelt city stand as a microcosm of problems of women, nonbinary, and trans citizens from around the world?

We’ll also discuss how women, nonbinary, and trans poets create long-lasting community. Which outreach strategies of outreach and organization are replicable in other cities? How are poets, both inside and outside the academy, perceived by society? How do they contribute to cross-cultural interactions that reconfigure the way people make meaning of the world?

Poets and activists Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz exemplify “the spirit of Houston.” They produce literature with insight on several “planks” from the 1977 Women’s Conference–touching on topics such as domestic violence, disability and healthcare, gender expression, financial inequality, infertility and reproductive freedom–with a contemporary perspective on political regression and reaction, “survival and change.” In their poetry and poetics, these writers carry the torch of the landmark Women’s Conference in Houston, and shed new light on its complicated legacy.

ACCESSIBILITY:
An accessiblity ramp is located at the front entrance of Student Center South by the stairs. An elevator is located on the left after you enter the sliding doors. Nearest handicapped parking is across the street near Hilton or at the corner of Calhoun and University.

Thinking Its Presence: ‘Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form’ & ‘The Raced Pronoun’

October 20, 2017

Dear TIP-sters!

Here’s where I’ll be at TIP:

Friday, Oct 20, 2017:

2-3:50p Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form, Education North, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Shamala Gallagher, Larissa Lai, Trish Salah, Addie Tsai, moderated by Ching-In Chen)

What is the “ephemera of evidence” (or troubled lineages) from which we as trans/genderqueer/queer makers draw from? What is the relationship amongst experimental aesthetics, speculation and representation in relation to our built structures? How do we consider questions of tradition and belonging within this lineage? This innovative presentation (reading/performance/panel) gathers trans/genderqueer/queer writers/artists/performers/theorists to investigate the genrequeer or cross-genre form in QTPOC cultural production.

7p Thinking Its Presence Board Presents, Theater at Poetry Center, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Vidhu Aggarwal, Ching-In Chen, Lisa Jarrett, Farid Matuk, Lehua Taitano) – Join the TIP board as we share creative work & reflections!

Saturday, Oct 21, 2017:

11a-12:50p The Raced Pronoun, Poetry Center Classroom 205, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Ching-In Chen, Jai Dulani, Soham Patel, Mg Roberts, Bishakh Som)

This panel is in response to the 2015 AWP panel entitled, “I Am We As You Are Me: Exploring Pronouns In Experimental Poetry,” where the question of whether pronouns are raced was discussed. This hybrid performance seeks to explore questions of intersections of race, diaspora, embodiment and language through Asian American responses to pronoun shifts and usage which evoke the bodily materiality of language and identity in multiple selves and contexts. What does it mean, as Sara Ahmed writes, to “live it” in everyday situations?