Entropy Best of 2017 list, Dec 2 Public Poetry reading @ HPL Young Branch & Dec 14 Tintero & MFAH Around the Block reading!

December 2, 2017

A thank you to Janice Lee & Entropy for including ‘recombinant’ on this incredible list of Entropy‘s Best of 2017: Best Poetry Books & Poetry Collections list. 

Also, some upcoming readings!

Sat, December 2, 2p — Public Poetry Reading @ Houston Public Library, Young Branch (5107 Griggs Road) with Niki Herd, Erica Nicole, Henk Rossouw & Rj Wright

Thurs, December 14, 6-8p — Around the Block: A Night of Literary Voices @ Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Join the Museum of Fine Arts and Tintero Projects for a unique night of literary art!

Five Houston writers (Ching-In Chen, Corinna Delgado, Christopher Diaz, Icess Fernandez Rojas & Josh Inocéncio) present work inspired by the exhibition HOME—So Different, So Appealing. You’ll join the writers on a walk around the “neighborhoods” and “hogares” (homes) presented in the exhibition.

About Tintero Projects
Tintero Projects promotes writing and reading opportunities for emerging Latinx poets and writers of color in the Houston–Galveston/Gulf Coast Region, providing community through writing workshops, readings, collaborative art events, submission events, and a monthly reading series.

This program and access to the exhibion are free! On Thursdays, Museum admission is free, courtesy of Shell. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Related Program
Inspired by the exhibition “HOME—So Different, So Appealing” and community partner Tintero Projects, this collaboration brings another event, on December 7: Casa Mía: A Writing Workshop on “HOME.”

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Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes in Austin (EAST Show) Nov 11-18, 2017

November 11, 2017

Austin friendlies! Some of my poetry has been made into broadsides as part of ‘Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes’ featuring Photographs by Sharon Beals & Literature on (Im)migration by Chaitali SenDena AfrasiabiMaria Reva, writers from Youth Rise Texas & me! This & next weekend, Saturday & Sunday, 11a-6pm, Prizer Arts & Letters, 2023 e. cesar chavez, austin! as part of the East Austin Studio Tour on Nov 11-18! Thanks to Abe Louise Young for organizing!

Birds’ Nests and Refuge: Impermanent Homes (EAST Show)

https://www.facebook.com/events/126272001421468/

See international photographer Sharon Beals’ stunning photographs of birds’ nests and nests created by humans out of beach plastic–alongside moving prose and poetry by literary writers on the themes of immigration and migration: Chaitali SenChing-In ChenDena Afrasiabi and Maria Reva.

What are our human nests in a time of global change?

Play with found materials in our Creativity Room (shredded paper, feathers, buttons, fabric and more) to create a nest of your own.

Light refreshments and beverages served, open to all.

BIOS

Sharon Beals is a San Francisco Bay Area-based photographer concerned with the environment and natural habitat. She is the author of *Nests: Fifty Nests and the Birds that Built Them* (Chronicle Books, Spring 2011).

Chaitali Sen is the author of The Pathless Sky, published by Europa Editions in 2015. Born in India and raised in New York and Pennsylvania, she currently lives in Austin, Texas with her husband and stepson. FullSizeRender-4 copyHer short stories, reviews, and essays have appeared in New England Review, New Ohio Review, Colorado Review, Catapult, Brooklyn Magazine, The Aerogram, Los Angeles Review of Books, and other journals. She is a graduate of the Hunter College MFA program in Fiction.
www.chaitalisen.com

Dena Afrasiabi’s fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in The Toast, Fiction Southeast, JMWW and the anthology Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers (University of Arkansas Press). Her work has received fellowship support from the Millay Colony, The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. She’s also the co-founding editor of the journal Elsewhere Lit.
https://twitter.com/AfrasiabiDena

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017).They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundations writing communities. Chen is also the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011; AK Press 2016) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). Their work has appeared in The Best American Experimental Writing, The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing, and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. They are a senior editor of The Conversant and poetry editor of the Texas Review. They currently teach creative writing at Sam Houston State University. www.chinginchen.com

Maria Reva was born in Ukraine and grew up in Vancouver, BC. Her stories have appeared in magazines such as The Atlantic and The New Quarterly, and have been anthologized in The Journey Prize Stories 29 and The Best American Short Stories 2017. She is a fiction fellow at the Michener Center for Writers, where she is at work on a linked story collection set in Soviet Ukraine.
www.mariareva.ca

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

November 7, 2017

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

Bayou City Rm 219, Student Center South @ University of Houston

https://www.facebook.com/events/146587129303753/

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION:
To provide a chemical and fragrance free event, we request that participants not smoke before or during the event and to not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event. Please read at the bottom for handicap accessibility information.

Roundtable-Reading on Houston-Based Feminist Poetics with Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz

In 1977, the year the IWY National Women’s Conference converged in Houston, Audre Lorde published her seminal essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” in which she posits that poetry “forms the quality of light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” For Lorde, poems are the precursor to activism, “the spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas.”

Forty year later, Houston is a uniquely fertile city for cross-pollination and conversation, especially in the arts and humanities, and particularly in our vibrant poetry communities. While painstaking progress has been made, the welfare of Texas women, nonbinary, and trans citizens are threatened by ongoing political tensions about “bathroom bills,” title IX, immigration, insurance, government grants, higher education curricula, and a dearth of diversity in the current federal administration.

This roundtable-reading reimagines the definition of civic engagement, establishing a place for the arts as a vital conduit for progressive policy, as imagined by Lorde. We’ll explore poetry’s thorny relationship with representation. To what extent does Houston’s position as a rapidly-developing Sunbelt city stand as a microcosm of problems of women, nonbinary, and trans citizens from around the world?

We’ll also discuss how women, nonbinary, and trans poets create long-lasting community. Which outreach strategies of outreach and organization are replicable in other cities? How are poets, both inside and outside the academy, perceived by society? How do they contribute to cross-cultural interactions that reconfigure the way people make meaning of the world?

Poets and activists Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz exemplify “the spirit of Houston.” They produce literature with insight on several “planks” from the 1977 Women’s Conference–touching on topics such as domestic violence, disability and healthcare, gender expression, financial inequality, infertility and reproductive freedom–with a contemporary perspective on political regression and reaction, “survival and change.” In their poetry and poetics, these writers carry the torch of the landmark Women’s Conference in Houston, and shed new light on its complicated legacy.

ACCESSIBILITY:
An accessiblity ramp is located at the front entrance of Student Center South by the stairs. An elevator is located on the left after you enter the sliding doors. Nearest handicapped parking is across the street near Hilton or at the corner of Calhoun and University.

Thinking Its Presence: ‘Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form’ & ‘The Raced Pronoun’

October 20, 2017

Dear TIP-sters!

Here’s where I’ll be at TIP:

Friday, Oct 20, 2017:

2-3:50p Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form, Education North, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Shamala Gallagher, Larissa Lai, Trish Salah, Addie Tsai, moderated by Ching-In Chen)

What is the “ephemera of evidence” (or troubled lineages) from which we as trans/genderqueer/queer makers draw from? What is the relationship amongst experimental aesthetics, speculation and representation in relation to our built structures? How do we consider questions of tradition and belonging within this lineage? This innovative presentation (reading/performance/panel) gathers trans/genderqueer/queer writers/artists/performers/theorists to investigate the genrequeer or cross-genre form in QTPOC cultural production.

7p Thinking Its Presence Board Presents, Theater at Poetry Center, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Vidhu Aggarwal, Ching-In Chen, Lisa Jarrett, Farid Matuk, Lehua Taitano) – Join the TIP board as we share creative work & reflections!

Saturday, Oct 21, 2017:

11a-12:50p The Raced Pronoun, Poetry Center Classroom 205, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Ching-In Chen, Jai Dulani, Soham Patel, Mg Roberts, Bishakh Som)

This panel is in response to the 2015 AWP panel entitled, “I Am We As You Are Me: Exploring Pronouns In Experimental Poetry,” where the question of whether pronouns are raced was discussed. This hybrid performance seeks to explore questions of intersections of race, diaspora, embodiment and language through Asian American responses to pronoun shifts and usage which evoke the bodily materiality of language and identity in multiple selves and contexts. What does it mean, as Sara Ahmed writes, to “live it” in everyday situations?

The Environment of the Classroom @ Center for Women Writers, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC

September 22, 2017

21765786_1440583909362887_261417008017333640_oThanks to Metta Sáma & Center for Women Writers for organizing this conversation on the environment of identity politics in the college classroom! Excited to talk teaching with Ailish HopperPrageeta SharmaErica Chu & Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs @ 1p, tomorrow/Friday @ Gramley Library, Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Hope to see you if you’re in the area!

‘recombinant’ in milwaukee (8.1), new york (8.3) & austin (8.18)!

August 1, 2017

Upcoming ‘recombinant’ readings!

Tues, August 1, 7p: Milwaukee Poetry Reading featuring Ching-In Chen, Dawn Tefft & Brenda Cárdenas @ Woodland Pattern (720 E. Locust St.)

More information: http://woodlandpattern.org/events/?event=337

Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart’s Traffic and recombinant and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets. A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. A senior editor of The Conversant, they serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, Solidarity in the Arts. While completing their PhD in Creative Writing at University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, they served as editor-in-chief of cream city review as well as on the Woodland Pattern board and the Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission. A poetry editor of the Texas Review, they are assistant professor of poetry at Sam Houston State University.

Brenda Cárdenas is the author of Boomerang (Bilingual Press) and the chapbooks Bread of the Earth / The Last Colors with Roberto Harrison (Decentralized Publications); Achiote Seeds/Semillas de Achiote with Critstina García, Emmy Pérez, and Gabriela Erandi Rico (Achiote Seeds); and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone (Momotombo Press). She also co-edited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance (Spuyten Duyvil Press and Dispatches Editions) and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest (MARCH/Abrazo Press). Cárdenas’ poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Latino Poetics: The Art of Poetry, The Golden Shovel Anthology: New Poems Honoring Gwendolyn Brooks, POETRY, City Creatures: Animal Encounters in the Chicago Wilderness, Angels of the Americlypse: New Latin@ Writing, The Quarry: A Social Justice Database, the Library of Congress’ Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers, Jet Fuel Review, The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry, and many others. Cárdenas served as the Milwaukee Poet Laureate from 2010-2012 and teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Dawn Tefft’s poems appear in Fence, Denver Quarterly, and BlazeVOX, among other journals. Her chapbooks include Fist, The Walking Dead: A Lyric, and Field Trip to My Mother and Other Exotic Locations. Her nonfiction has been published in Truthout, Jacobin, PopMatters, and Woodland Pattern’s blog. She holds a PhD in Creative Writing from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and works as a higher ed union organizer.

https://www.facebook.com/events/851009661729817/

 

Thurs, August 3, 7p: NYC Poets House Showcase Reading featuring Aziza Barnes, Ching-In Chen, Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib & DéLana R. A. Dameron @ Kray Hall, 10 River Ter

Join us for an installment of our fantastic Showcase 2017 Reading Series, with readings by Aziza Barnes (‘i be, but i ain’t,’ YesYes Books); Ching-In Chen (‘recombinant,’ Kelsey Street Press); Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib (‘The Crown Ain’t Worth Much,’ Button Poetry); and DéLana R. A. Dameron (‘Weary Kingdom,’ Palmetto Poetry Series)

https://www.poetshouse.org/programs-and-events/readings-and-conversations/showcase-reading-series-aziza-barnes-ching-chen-hanif

https://www.facebook.com/events/114222132565375/

Fri, August 18, 7p: Ching-In Chen Austin Book Launch with mónica teresa ortiz & Jesus Valles @ Malvern Books (613 W 29th St, Austin, Texas)

Join us in celebrating the launch of Ching-In Chen’s new poetry collection, “recombinant.” With readings from Ching-In Chen, mónica teresa ortiz, and Jesus Valles.

“Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant’ is an innovative and powerful collection about genealogy, migration, survival, gender, memory, and ecology. The poems unearth and recombine fragments from museum artifacts, laws, census data, and historical archives with lyric reflections and open-heart composition strategies. By the end, you will feel haunted by the ghosts and ancestors who have continued their journey in the vessel of the poet’s tongue.” —Craig Santos Perez

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi Books) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press; AK Press) and Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. A senior editor of The Conversant, they serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, and Solidarity in the Arts. They are an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and poetry editor of the Texas Review.

mónica teresa ortiz was born and raised in Texas. Her work has appeared in Pilgrimage Magazine, Borderlands, the Texas Observer, Black Girl Dangerous, and elsewhere. A two-time Andres Montoya Letras Latinas Poetry Prize finalist, ortiz is the poetry editor for Raspa Magazine, a queer Latino literary art journal.

* A note on parking: If parking is unavailable in the store parking lot, please use residential streets. Or, for evening events, you can park at Breed Hardware, 718 W. 29th Street, when they’re closed (they close at 7pm Mon – Fri). And if you park in our lot, please watch out for potholes! *

https://www.facebook.com/events/504443466556149/

Kundiman Asian American Specularity reading & discussion panel this weekend @ WisCon in Madison!

May 27, 2017

Excited to attend my 1st WisCon with Kundiman friends!

Reading today/Saturday 4-5:15p as part of the Kundiman Asian American Specularity: Robots Speak Back! reading @ WisCon 41 in Conference Rm 4 @ Madison Concourse with Vidhu Aggarwal, Margaret Rhee & Timothy Yu!

On Sunday, we will participate in the Reframing Techno-orientalisms: Asian Diasporic Speculative Literatures and Media discussion panel in Conference 3 @ Madison Concourse. In this discussion panel, scholars and writers of speculative literature will rethink techno-orientalist configurations of Asian diasporic subjects in film, writing, and media. Even as Asian bodies have been depicted as robotic, mechanical, and reflective of futuristic anxieties, Asian diasporic scholars and writers have continued to rework machine tropes in poetry, film, and other genres. In U.S. science fiction film and fiction (Blade Runner, Neuromancer, Snow Crash), the foreignness of Asia is aligned with exotic technological innovation. In relation to such persistent tropes in contemporary science fiction film and literature, Asian writers and artists in the diaspora discuss various cross-cultural interventions via alternative futurisms, recombinant texts, and speculative media projects in their writing, scholarship, and teaching. Margaret Rhee will discuss the representations of Asian American woman and labor in the films Ex-Machina and Blade Runner. Ching-In Chen will discuss Asian diasporic speculative re-writings in the work of Larissa Lai and Cathy Park Hong. Vidhu Aggarwal, Noel Mariano and others will discuss “Asian American” as a cyborg/speculative assemblage identity.

Houston Brazos Bookstore Reading with Kimberly Alidio & John Pluecker, 7p, May 19!

May 19, 2017

Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant,’ Kimberly Alidio’s ‘after projects, the resound’ & John Pluecker’s ‘Ford Over’

Join us in celebrating the launch of Ching-In Chen’s new poetry collection, *recombinant* from Kelsey Street Press, alongside Kimberly Alidio’s *After projects the resound* from Black Radish and John Pluecker’s *Ford Over* from Noemi Press and a translation of Sara Uribe’s *Antígona González* from Les Figues Press.

KIMBERLY ALIDIO wrote *After projects the resound* (Black Radish, 2016) and *solitude being alien* (dancing girl press, 2013). She is the inaugural artist-in-residence at the Center for Art and Thought and a poetry fellow of Kundiman and VONA. She received fellowships from Naropa University’s Summer Writing Program and the University of Illinois’s Asian American Studies Program, as well as a doctorate in modern American history from the University of Michigan. A tenure-track dropout and high-school teacher, she hails from Baltimore and lives in East Austin, Texas.

CHING-IN CHEN is the author of *The Heart’s Traffic* (Arktoi Books) and *recombinant*(Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of *The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities* (South End Press; AK Press) and *Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets* (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. A senior editor of *The Conversant,* they serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, and Solidarity in the Arts. They are an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and poetry editor of the *Texas Review.* www.chinginchen.com

JOHN PLUECKER is a writer, translator, interpreter, artist. He frequently collaborates with others, especially with artists, organizations and communities; one example is the language justice and literary experimentation collaborative Antena he co-founded with Jen Hofer in 2010. He has translated numerous books from the Spanish, including *Antígona González* (Les Figues Press, 2016) and *Tijuana Dreaming: Life and Art at the Global Border* (Duke University Press, 2012). His book of poetry and image, *Ford Over,* was released in 2016 from Noemi Press. He is a member of the Macondo Writing Workshop.

***
Please note: BRAZOS BOOKSTORE has a wheelchair ramp and is wheelchair accessible. If you have other accessibility needs or need other accommodations, please call Brazos at (713) 523-0701.

book launch for ‘recombinant’ at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville today!

April 10, 2017

SHSU/Huntsville friendlies, hope you can join me for the Huntsville book launch for ‘recombinant’ today/Monday, 5:30p in Austin Hall! Thanks to SHSU CHSS Diversity & Inclusion Committee & SHSU LGBTQI* Faculty and Staff Network for co-sponsoring this event! This event is free and open to the public!

Here’s the Facebook event for more information:

recombinanthttps://www.facebook.com/events/1295381293871567/

Houston! “recombinant” reading and book signing

March 18, 2017

Saturday, March 18, 2017, 2-4p

MicroSpace Houston – 8119 Concho st, Houston, Texas 77036

Ching-In Chen will present a live reading of their newest book ‘recombinant’ along with a Q&A with the author, and a book signing. Copies of the book will be available for $15 (cash), $16.95 + tax (credit).

Donations for the artist and artspace graciously accepted. Concessions available for donation.

Please note: The venue has a few steps at the entryway and is not wheelchair accessible. If you have accessabilty needs please contact us and we will make accommodations. Microspacehouston@gmail.com

About ‘recombinant’:

Can a poetry seek to examine the erasure and reconstruction of a community history? Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant’ is a work of material critique, philosophically jarring in its use of syntax, sound, the erasures held in the stillness of its whitespace that again and again mimic a historical registry. Drafting and growing multiple discourses, this text urges the reader to investigate female and genderqueer lineages in the context of labor smuggling and trafficking. Its syntactical utterances create a music that is masterful in these poems’ fractured words and experimental representation of page and praxis. Voices from various communities interact with each other to create what Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan calls an assertion of diasporan realities where multi-directional, heterogeneous modes of representation challenge conventional representation via photographs; newspaper articles; maps; city directories; records of immigration, birth and death; as well as scholarly research and archaeological records. recombinant is a work of insistence, a refusal of erasure, a proof of shared memory through the rewriting and remixing of historical remnant.

Praise for ‘recombinant’:

The sweat of migrants, the starving bodies of impoverished workers, the they-children raised for export, the identification cards of the disobedient bodies with multiple names, the testimonies in interrogation rooms, the manufactured girl-bombs: the historical and linguistic presence, aliveness and residue of ancestral, immigrant lineages…in recombinant these entities are synthesized into brilliantly engineered narratives that chronicle the limits of what can be held at the borders we construct around our various identities, be they bodily, linguistic, national, occupational, familial, commercial….This is an intricate, careful, impression-making, impressive novel of a poem that necessarily exposes the secret testimonies and histories of the worlds among us that our larger world wishes us to never understand or see.

—Daniel Borzutzky

Promising “[n]o memory what I held in my mouth that bright morning,” Ching-In Chen’s recombinant undertakes the difficult work of witnessing without false promises of consolation or recognition. Accumulating and unsettling the cartographic records and rememorabilia of lives lived and lives lost to violence in this land that is always island, recombinant maps histories of Yellow Peril, race riots, and white slavery, the latter as imaginary alibi for the former, and opens out their interlock with and interlocution of anti-Black racisms, slaveries and lynchings and ongoing colonial genocides of Indigenous peoples.

How might a poem diagram destruction? What survives records or doesn’t, leaves traces, ledgers or ghosts’ marginalia? It is a bleak and beautiful summoning, one that discovers/inscribes a world anew in testifying to the destruction of this one.

—Trish Salah

Ching-In Chen’s recombinant is an innovative and powerful collection about genealogy, migration, survival, gender, memory, and ecology. The poems unearth and recombine fragments from museum artifacts, laws, census data, and historical archives with lyric reflections and open-heart composition strategies. By the end, you will feel haunted by the ghosts and ancestors who have continued their journey in the vessel of the poet’s tongue.

—Craig Santos Perez’

About Ching-In Chen:

‘Ching-In Chen is author of ‘The Heart’s Traffic’ (Arktoi Books/Red Hen Press) and ‘recombinant’ (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of ‘The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities’ (South End Press, AK Press) and ‘Here is A Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets’ (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities, and have been a participant in Sharon Bridgforth’s Theatrical Jazz Institute. They have also been awarded fellowships from Can Serrat, Millay Colony for the Arts, the Norman Mailer Center and Imagining America. Their work has appeared in ‘The Best American Experimental Writing,’ ‘The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing,’ and ‘Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.’ A senior editor of ‘The Conversant,’ they have also served on the Woodland Pattern board, Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission and as editor-in-chief of cream city review. They are currently an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and Poetry Editor of the Texas Review. http://www.chinginchen.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/254045115053423/