Archive for the ‘Readings/Performances’ Category

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

November 7, 2017

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

Bayou City Rm 219, Student Center South @ University of Houston

https://www.facebook.com/events/146587129303753/

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION:
To provide a chemical and fragrance free event, we request that participants not smoke before or during the event and to not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event. Please read at the bottom for handicap accessibility information.

Roundtable-Reading on Houston-Based Feminist Poetics with Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz

In 1977, the year the IWY National Women’s Conference converged in Houston, Audre Lorde published her seminal essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” in which she posits that poetry “forms the quality of light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” For Lorde, poems are the precursor to activism, “the spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas.”

Forty year later, Houston is a uniquely fertile city for cross-pollination and conversation, especially in the arts and humanities, and particularly in our vibrant poetry communities. While painstaking progress has been made, the welfare of Texas women, nonbinary, and trans citizens are threatened by ongoing political tensions about “bathroom bills,” title IX, immigration, insurance, government grants, higher education curricula, and a dearth of diversity in the current federal administration.

This roundtable-reading reimagines the definition of civic engagement, establishing a place for the arts as a vital conduit for progressive policy, as imagined by Lorde. We’ll explore poetry’s thorny relationship with representation. To what extent does Houston’s position as a rapidly-developing Sunbelt city stand as a microcosm of problems of women, nonbinary, and trans citizens from around the world?

We’ll also discuss how women, nonbinary, and trans poets create long-lasting community. Which outreach strategies of outreach and organization are replicable in other cities? How are poets, both inside and outside the academy, perceived by society? How do they contribute to cross-cultural interactions that reconfigure the way people make meaning of the world?

Poets and activists Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz exemplify “the spirit of Houston.” They produce literature with insight on several “planks” from the 1977 Women’s Conference–touching on topics such as domestic violence, disability and healthcare, gender expression, financial inequality, infertility and reproductive freedom–with a contemporary perspective on political regression and reaction, “survival and change.” In their poetry and poetics, these writers carry the torch of the landmark Women’s Conference in Houston, and shed new light on its complicated legacy.

ACCESSIBILITY:
An accessiblity ramp is located at the front entrance of Student Center South by the stairs. An elevator is located on the left after you enter the sliding doors. Nearest handicapped parking is across the street near Hilton or at the corner of Calhoun and University.

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Thinking Its Presence: ‘Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form’ & ‘The Raced Pronoun’

October 20, 2017

Dear TIP-sters!

Here’s where I’ll be at TIP:

Friday, Oct 20, 2017:

2-3:50p Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form, Education North, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Shamala Gallagher, Larissa Lai, Trish Salah, Addie Tsai, moderated by Ching-In Chen)

What is the “ephemera of evidence” (or troubled lineages) from which we as trans/genderqueer/queer makers draw from? What is the relationship amongst experimental aesthetics, speculation and representation in relation to our built structures? How do we consider questions of tradition and belonging within this lineage? This innovative presentation (reading/performance/panel) gathers trans/genderqueer/queer writers/artists/performers/theorists to investigate the genrequeer or cross-genre form in QTPOC cultural production.

7p Thinking Its Presence Board Presents, Theater at Poetry Center, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Vidhu Aggarwal, Ching-In Chen, Lisa Jarrett, Farid Matuk, Lehua Taitano) – Join the TIP board as we share creative work & reflections!

Saturday, Oct 21, 2017:

11a-12:50p The Raced Pronoun, Poetry Center Classroom 205, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Ching-In Chen, Jai Dulani, Soham Patel, Mg Roberts, Bishakh Som)

This panel is in response to the 2015 AWP panel entitled, “I Am We As You Are Me: Exploring Pronouns In Experimental Poetry,” where the question of whether pronouns are raced was discussed. This hybrid performance seeks to explore questions of intersections of race, diaspora, embodiment and language through Asian American responses to pronoun shifts and usage which evoke the bodily materiality of language and identity in multiple selves and contexts. What does it mean, as Sara Ahmed writes, to “live it” in everyday situations?

The Environment of the Classroom @ Center for Women Writers, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC

September 22, 2017

21765786_1440583909362887_261417008017333640_oThanks to Metta Sáma & Center for Women Writers for organizing this conversation on the environment of identity politics in the college classroom! Excited to talk teaching with Ailish HopperPrageeta SharmaErica Chu & Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs @ 1p, tomorrow/Friday @ Gramley Library, Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Hope to see you if you’re in the area!

Houston Brazos Bookstore Reading with Kimberly Alidio & John Pluecker, 7p, May 19!

May 19, 2017

Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant,’ Kimberly Alidio’s ‘after projects, the resound’ & John Pluecker’s ‘Ford Over’

Join us in celebrating the launch of Ching-In Chen’s new poetry collection, *recombinant* from Kelsey Street Press, alongside Kimberly Alidio’s *After projects the resound* from Black Radish and John Pluecker’s *Ford Over* from Noemi Press and a translation of Sara Uribe’s *Antígona González* from Les Figues Press.

KIMBERLY ALIDIO wrote *After projects the resound* (Black Radish, 2016) and *solitude being alien* (dancing girl press, 2013). She is the inaugural artist-in-residence at the Center for Art and Thought and a poetry fellow of Kundiman and VONA. She received fellowships from Naropa University’s Summer Writing Program and the University of Illinois’s Asian American Studies Program, as well as a doctorate in modern American history from the University of Michigan. A tenure-track dropout and high-school teacher, she hails from Baltimore and lives in East Austin, Texas.

CHING-IN CHEN is the author of *The Heart’s Traffic* (Arktoi Books) and *recombinant*(Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of *The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities* (South End Press; AK Press) and *Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets* (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. A senior editor of *The Conversant,* they serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, and Solidarity in the Arts. They are an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and poetry editor of the *Texas Review.* www.chinginchen.com

JOHN PLUECKER is a writer, translator, interpreter, artist. He frequently collaborates with others, especially with artists, organizations and communities; one example is the language justice and literary experimentation collaborative Antena he co-founded with Jen Hofer in 2010. He has translated numerous books from the Spanish, including *Antígona González* (Les Figues Press, 2016) and *Tijuana Dreaming: Life and Art at the Global Border* (Duke University Press, 2012). His book of poetry and image, *Ford Over,* was released in 2016 from Noemi Press. He is a member of the Macondo Writing Workshop.

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Please note: BRAZOS BOOKSTORE has a wheelchair ramp and is wheelchair accessible. If you have other accessibility needs or need other accommodations, please call Brazos at (713) 523-0701.

book launch for ‘recombinant’ at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville today!

April 10, 2017

SHSU/Huntsville friendlies, hope you can join me for the Huntsville book launch for ‘recombinant’ today/Monday, 5:30p in Austin Hall! Thanks to SHSU CHSS Diversity & Inclusion Committee & SHSU LGBTQI* Faculty and Staff Network for co-sponsoring this event! This event is free and open to the public!

Here’s the Facebook event for more information:

recombinanthttps://www.facebook.com/events/1295381293871567/

Houston! “recombinant” reading and book signing

March 18, 2017

Saturday, March 18, 2017, 2-4p

MicroSpace Houston – 8119 Concho st, Houston, Texas 77036

Ching-In Chen will present a live reading of their newest book ‘recombinant’ along with a Q&A with the author, and a book signing. Copies of the book will be available for $15 (cash), $16.95 + tax (credit).

Donations for the artist and artspace graciously accepted. Concessions available for donation.

Please note: The venue has a few steps at the entryway and is not wheelchair accessible. If you have accessabilty needs please contact us and we will make accommodations. Microspacehouston@gmail.com

About ‘recombinant’:

Can a poetry seek to examine the erasure and reconstruction of a community history? Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant’ is a work of material critique, philosophically jarring in its use of syntax, sound, the erasures held in the stillness of its whitespace that again and again mimic a historical registry. Drafting and growing multiple discourses, this text urges the reader to investigate female and genderqueer lineages in the context of labor smuggling and trafficking. Its syntactical utterances create a music that is masterful in these poems’ fractured words and experimental representation of page and praxis. Voices from various communities interact with each other to create what Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan calls an assertion of diasporan realities where multi-directional, heterogeneous modes of representation challenge conventional representation via photographs; newspaper articles; maps; city directories; records of immigration, birth and death; as well as scholarly research and archaeological records. recombinant is a work of insistence, a refusal of erasure, a proof of shared memory through the rewriting and remixing of historical remnant.

Praise for ‘recombinant’:

The sweat of migrants, the starving bodies of impoverished workers, the they-children raised for export, the identification cards of the disobedient bodies with multiple names, the testimonies in interrogation rooms, the manufactured girl-bombs: the historical and linguistic presence, aliveness and residue of ancestral, immigrant lineages…in recombinant these entities are synthesized into brilliantly engineered narratives that chronicle the limits of what can be held at the borders we construct around our various identities, be they bodily, linguistic, national, occupational, familial, commercial….This is an intricate, careful, impression-making, impressive novel of a poem that necessarily exposes the secret testimonies and histories of the worlds among us that our larger world wishes us to never understand or see.

—Daniel Borzutzky

Promising “[n]o memory what I held in my mouth that bright morning,” Ching-In Chen’s recombinant undertakes the difficult work of witnessing without false promises of consolation or recognition. Accumulating and unsettling the cartographic records and rememorabilia of lives lived and lives lost to violence in this land that is always island, recombinant maps histories of Yellow Peril, race riots, and white slavery, the latter as imaginary alibi for the former, and opens out their interlock with and interlocution of anti-Black racisms, slaveries and lynchings and ongoing colonial genocides of Indigenous peoples.

How might a poem diagram destruction? What survives records or doesn’t, leaves traces, ledgers or ghosts’ marginalia? It is a bleak and beautiful summoning, one that discovers/inscribes a world anew in testifying to the destruction of this one.

—Trish Salah

Ching-In Chen’s recombinant is an innovative and powerful collection about genealogy, migration, survival, gender, memory, and ecology. The poems unearth and recombine fragments from museum artifacts, laws, census data, and historical archives with lyric reflections and open-heart composition strategies. By the end, you will feel haunted by the ghosts and ancestors who have continued their journey in the vessel of the poet’s tongue.

—Craig Santos Perez’

About Ching-In Chen:

‘Ching-In Chen is author of ‘The Heart’s Traffic’ (Arktoi Books/Red Hen Press) and ‘recombinant’ (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of ‘The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities’ (South End Press, AK Press) and ‘Here is A Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets’ (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities, and have been a participant in Sharon Bridgforth’s Theatrical Jazz Institute. They have also been awarded fellowships from Can Serrat, Millay Colony for the Arts, the Norman Mailer Center and Imagining America. Their work has appeared in ‘The Best American Experimental Writing,’ ‘The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing,’ and ‘Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.’ A senior editor of ‘The Conversant,’ they have also served on the Woodland Pattern board, Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission and as editor-in-chief of cream city review. They are currently an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and Poetry Editor of the Texas Review. http://www.chinginchen.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/254045115053423/

Litanies to My Brown Heavenly Body (honoring Mark Aguhar)

March 12, 2017

Mark Aguhar

LAMBDA LITFEST LA 2017 (www.lambdalitfest.org) PRESENTS:
Poetics of Self [Re/De] Construction: Litanies to My Brown Heavenly Body (honoring Mark Aguhar)

In homage to Pilipinx trans, femme artist, Mark Aguhar, Poetics of Self [Re/De] Construction: Litanies to My Brown Heavenly Body, queer writers-of-color in this creative reading and panel will explore how our very bodies become litanies, invocations of our existence, our world-making possibilities as what Parreñas Shimizu calls “sites for imagining alternative realities.”

Curated by: Muriel Leung

Performers:

Chen Chen is the author of When I Grow Up I Want to Be a List of Further Possibilities, winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize and forthcoming spring 2017 from BOA Editions, Ltd. Chen’s work has appeared in two chapbooks and in publications such as Poetry, Gulf Coast, Buzzfeed, and The Best American Poetry. He has received fellowships from Kundiman, Lambda Literary, and the Saltonstall Foundation. Currently, he is pursuing a PhD in English and Creative Writing at Texas Tech University. For more, visit chenchenwrites.com.

Vanessa Angélica Villarreal is a poet, essayist, and artist born in the borderlands in McAllen, Texas. Her poems have appeared in PBS Newshour, Waxwing, Caketrain, DIAGRAM, DREGINALD, The Feminist Wire, The Western Humanities Review, The Poetry Foundation Harriet Blog, and elsewhere. Most recently, she has served as an editor for the Bettering American Poetry project. She is a CantoMundo Fellow and her book, BEAST MERIDIAN, was a finalist at Nightboat, FuturePoem, Saturnalia, and Willow Books, and is forthcoming from Noemi Press in early 2017. She currently lives and works in Los Angeles, and her hometown is Houston, Texas.

Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017) as well as the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011; AK Press, 2016) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). A Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. They have also been awarded fellowships from Can Serrat, Millay Colony for the Arts, the Norman Mailer Center and Imagining America. They serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, Solidarity in the Arts as the Director of Membership and Social Media and are a senior editor for The Conversant. Currently, they teach poetry at Sam Houston State University as an Assistant Professor in the English department.www.chinginchen.com

Kazumi Chin is the author of Having a Coke with Godzilla (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017). His work has appeared in GlitterMob, HEArt, Split This Rock’s Poem of the Week series, and elsewhere. His blog, GODZILIANA H8S UR COLONIAL BS can be found at kazumichin.wordpress.com. When he grows up, he wants to be Ariana Grande.

Michelle Lin is the author of A House Made of Water (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017). Her latest poems can be found in HEArt, Apogee, Powder Keg Magazine, and more. She has taught for the LEAPS summer program, Gluck Fellows Program for the Arts, Young Writer’s Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh. She has performed for Kearny Street Workshop’s APAture, grlhood–redefining the I // here I am, Litquake, and more. A former editor for journals Hot Metal Bridge, B.E. Quarterly, and Mosaic, she currently serves as Poetry Reader for Twelfth House Journal.

Kimberly Alidio wrote After projects the resound (Black Radish, 2016) and solitude being alien (dancing girl press, 2013). She is the inaugural artist-in-residence at the Center for Art and Thought and a poetry fellow of Kundiman and VONA. She received fellowships from Naropa University’s Summer Writing Program and the University of Illinois’s Asian American Studies Program, as well as a doctorate in modern American history from the University of Michigan. A tenure-track dropout and high-school teacher, she hails from Baltimore and lives in East Austin, Texas.

Born in Iloilo City, Philippines, Angela Peñaredondo is a Pilipinx/Pin@y poet and artist. Peñaredondo is the author of the chapbook, Maroon (Jamii Publications) and the book, All Things Lose Thousands of Times (winner of the Hillary Gravendyk Regional Poetry Prize, Inlandia Institute). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Drunken Boat, AAWW’s The Margins, Four Way Review, Cream City Review and elsewhere. Angela resides in Southern California, drifting between deserts, beaches, lowly cities and socially engineered suburbs.

Nicknamed “small but terrible” by her lola, Melissa R. Sipin was born and raised in Carson, CA. She co-edited Kuwento: Lost Things (Carayan Press 2014) and is Editor-in-Chief of TAYO Literary Magazine. Her work is in Guernica Magazine, Black Warrior Review, and PEN American Center, among others. Her fiction has won Glimmer Train’s Fiction Open and the Washington Square Review’s Flash Fiction Prize, as well as scholarships/fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Poets & Writers Inc., Kundiman, VONA/Voices Writers’ Workshop, Squaw Valley’s Community of Writers, and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. She is hard at work on a novel, is obsessed with yellow mangoes and ordering Chinese delivery when she’s finally found a home. More at: msipin.com

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Now more than ever, our stories matter. Don’t miss #LambdaLitFest Los Angeles, a FREE, weeklong literary festival that celebrates and honors and expands on the rich, diverse tradition of LGBTQ writers and readers in the Southland. Register now: http://bit.ly/2kqiIRi

https://www.facebook.com/events/1847207122185987/

{NYC] Process Talk at Asian American Writers’ Workshop: Jaswinder Bolina, Ching-In Chen, Bich Minh Nguyen, & Timothy Yu Tonight!

June 20, 2016

Monday, June 20, 7-9pm

Asian American Writers’ Workshop (110-112 W 27th Street, Suite 600)

Come through for our first installment of Process Talks—a salon-style multimedia show-n-tell—where innovative poets and novelists will screen the images that have been haunting their writing and discuss their writing process. We’re featuring award-winning poets Jaswinder Bolina, Ching-In Chen, Timothy Yu, and novelist Bich Minh Nguyen, all four of whom join us in a rare visit from out of town.

Poet Jaswinder Bolina is author of Phantom Camera (winner of the 2012 Green Rose Prize in Poetry from New Issues Press) and Carrier Wave (winner of the 2006 Colorado Prize for Poetry from the Center for Literary Publishing at Colorado State University). His work has been published in The Best American Poetry series, as well as The Poetry Foundation, The State, and Himal Southasian. He currently teaches on the faculty of the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing at the University of Miami.

A genderqueer, multi-genre writer Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009). A Kundiman, Lambda, and Callaloo Fellow, they are a community organizer who has worked in Asian American communities in San Francisco, Oakland, Riverside and Boston, and co-organized the third national Asian Pacific American Spoken Word and Poetry Summit in Boston. Chen is also the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). Check out Hana Maruyama writing about Ching-In’s explorations of the zuihitsu in The Margins.

Director of the Asian American Studies Program at UW-Madison, Timothy Yu is the author of 100 Chinese Silences, the editor’s selection in the Les Figues Press NOS Book Contest, and of Race and the Avant-Garde: Experimental and Asian American Poetry since 1965 (Stanford), winner of the Book Award in Literary Studies from the Association for Asian American Studies. Check out two of his poems in The Margins.

Bich Minh Nguyen is the author of three books: Short Girls, a novel, which won an American Book Award winner in fiction and a Library Journal best book of the year; Stealing Buddha’s Dinner, a memoir, received the PEN/Jerard Award from the PEN American Center and was a Chicago Tribune Best Book of the Year, as well as a finalist for AAWW’s own Asian American Literary Award. Her newest novel is Pioneer Girl, a literary mystery about a second-generation Vietnamese daughter and her family and their ties to The Little House on the Prairie.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1721633431433050/

Miami! Asian American Studies conference: Get Lit offsite reading + Asian American Poets Encounter the South

April 29, 2016

Dear lovelies,

I’ll be at the Association of Asian American Studies in Miami for these two events:

Get Lit in Miami!

Friday, April 29, 7-9p, The Cafe at Books and Books, Adrienne Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33132

You are cordially invited to an Association of Asian American Studies Conference offsite literary reading (with happy hour!), co-curated by Kundiman, Kaya, and the Asian American Literary Review.

Readers include: Cathy Linh Che, Ed Lin, Naomi Hirahara, Lawrence Minh-Bui Davis, Timothy Yu & Ching-In Chen

Note: There are several locations for Books & Books. This reading is at the location within a five-minute walk from the AAAS conference site.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1617836258541811/

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Sunday, April 30, 1:15-2:45p, Concierto Ballroom C

AAAS panel: Self-Articulation and Solidarity: Asian American Poets Encounter the South

Panelists: Vidhu Aggarwal, Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello, Ching-In Chen, Shamala Gallagher, Sarah Gambito

To live in the American South requires finding a way to understand oneself against a history of structural racial violence: to conceptualize oneself, implicitly or explicitly, in relation to the powerful black/white narrative of slavery, Jim Crow laws, and Civil Rights. Perhaps more than any other American region, the South is constituted in national and global cultural imaginaries by a story about race. In this story, Asian American subject positions are largely muted. To be an Asian American poet in the South, then, is to confront a master narrative in which one’s own subject position has no place; it is to insert oneself into this story as a rogue element, a destabilizing and complexifying force. Just as Asian Americans have been figured as outsiders in this country, the Asian American poetic utterance occurs at the margins of the Southern racial story, seeking to deepen and transform it from there.

In this formally hybrid panel—half poetry reading, half critical dialogue—the poets of Kundiman, an Asian American poetry collective, will speak to questions of what it could mean to be Asian American in the South. We will read poems that address Southern geographies—cultural, emotional, economic, ecological, visual—in order to offer visions toward a fuller and more nuanced understanding of Southern racial terrain. In this endeavor, we seek not to displace or downplay the intense realities of black Southern subjugation and liberation: instead, in claiming our presence in Southern space, we strive toward a self-articulation that is simultaneous with a multifaceted solidarity. Speaking from a multiplicity of Asian American subject positions, we will explore possibilities for connection with the heterogeneous communities of color living in the South—examining, for example, Asian American relationships to settler colonialism and indigenous rights as well as to questions of Latin American migration and border politics. In reaching across the critical/creative divide, this panel formally echoes the complicated and innovative work of boundary-crossing that Asian Americans must undertake in order to write ourselves into the Southern story.

Sam Houston State University MFA reading + Conversant

November 11, 2015

Happy to be reading Wednesday, Nov. 11 at 5 p.m. in Sam Houston State University’s Peabody Memorial Library (adjacent to Austin Hall) as part of the MFA program’s on-going reading series.  http://www.shsu.edu/today@sam/T@S/article/2015/chen-reading

 

Also, if you haven’t checked out the recent issue of The Conversant, November’s issue features Brian Teare with Christy Davids; Rosebud Ben-Oni with Matthew Salesses on his new book, The Hundred-Year Flood; Stacy Szymaszek with Matt Longabucco; Lynarra Featherly with Stacey Tran and Travis Meyer of Poor Claudia; Jane Joritz-Nakagawa with Bill Berkson; my interview with Maria Miranda Maloney of Mouthfeel Press; Mathew Timmons & Ben White’s The People: Episode 32 with Kristin Cammermeyer & Claire Rifelj; Andy Fitch’s interview with Nightboat author Andrew Durbin. Check it out at http://theconversant.org/