Archive for the ‘Readings/Performances’ Category

‘Spell for Safety’ poem in Origins + Robots Speak Back!: Asian American Speculative Poetry reading FRI/APR 20/11a-12:30p @ Split This Rock Poetry Festival

April 20, 2018

Asked to write a poem for Lavender Graduation last semester, I wrote “Spell for Safety” for the trans & genderqueer students who made it to the finish line. Thank you to Origins Literary Journal for giving it a home in the Split This Rock edition! & check out poems by lovelies Ashley M. JonesSham E-Ali NayeemApril GibsonRachelle CruzSahar Muradi & more!

http://www.originsjournal.com/split-this-rock-and-origins-journal-special-issue/2018/4/18/bvompfo8wu6ahid1hrhpq3pqt7olwk

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I’ll be reading speculative poems & writing/dreaming towards a more equitable world with Rachelle CruzSally Wen Mao & lo kwa mei-en FRI/APRIL 20, 11a-12:30p @ Robots Speak Back!: Asian American Speculative Poetry reading during Split This Rock Poetry Festival: 2018! We’ll be in National Housing Center Room B – 1201 15th Street NW, Washington DC. Come join us!

 

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My AWP 2018 Schedule

March 7, 2018

Wednesday, March 7, 2018:

7-9p Kelsey Street Press & Keep St. Pete Lit: Centenarian Vision @ Tampa Bay History Center, 801 Old Water St (with Eleanor Eichenbaum, Fred Hearns, Tenea Johnson, Gloria Muñoz, Paul Wilborn, Amber DiPietra & Sabrina Dalla Valle)

https://www.facebook.com/events/189544978290494/

Thursday, March 8, 2018:

9-10:15a Gender Outlaws: Teaching Gender Identity in Creative Writing Panel @ Rm 22, Tampa Convention Center, 1st Fl (with Jody Keisner, Meg Day & Misha Rai)

10:30-11:30a Red Hen Press signing @ Table #1123 @ Book Fair

7-10p Defending Home: An Eco-Inclusive Reading @ The Hideaway, 1120 E. Kennedy Blvd (with Joe Wilkins, Marco Wilkinson, Ben Rutherfurd, Molly Reid, Rosalie Moffett, Aviva Kasowski, Steven Kleinman, Matty Layne Glasgow, Nathan Gehoski, Shamala Gallagher, Nathan Dixon, Michael Copperman, Jennifer S. Cheng, Tamiko Beyer)

https://www.facebook.com/events/1661670380588008/

Friday, March 9, 2018:

3-4:15p Erasures, White Shame: We Need to Talk Panel @ Rm 20 & 21, Tampa Convention Center, 1st Fl (with Natalia Treviño, Rita Dove, Wendy Barker, Leanne Howe)

7-9p Reading Queer: Poetry in a Time of Chaos @ The Portico, 1001 N Florida Ave (with Bryan Borland, Cathleen Chambless, Gregg Shapiro, Jan Becker, Jericho Brown, J.P. Howard, Ruben Quesada, Sam Sax, Samiya Bashir, Shane Allison & Valerie Wetlaufer)

https://www.facebook.com/events/527051214344711/

Saturday, March 10, 2018:

12-12:30p Reading Queer anthology signing @ Anhinga Press Table #1602 @ Book Fair

9:30-11:30p Literaoke at AWP @ Lector’s POP UP Space, above The Hub, 715 N. Franklin

(with Samiya Bashir, Doug Brown, Ramy El-Etreby, Mira Jacob, Lillian Li, Jason Mccall, Rajiv Mohabir, Yesenia Montilla, Sally Wen Mao, Faisal Mohyuddin, Cynthia Dewi Oka, Dianca London, Soham Patel, Natalie Scenters-Zapico, Danny Thanh Nguyen)

https://www.facebook.com/events/196137841137617/

All Weekend: Sam Houston State MFA/Texas Review Table #751 @ Book Fair

LA Reading @ Otis College of Art & Design

February 7, 2018

LA/SoCal friendlies, I’ll be reading tonight @ 7:30p @ Otis College of Art and Design (9045 Lincoln Blvd) as part of the MFA Writing Program’s Visiting Writers Series. It’s free & open to the public! A big thanks to Marisa Matarazzo for organizing the reading & to Jen Hofer for recommending my work!

https://www.otis.edu/calendar/visiting-writers-series-ching-chen

Entropy Best of 2017 list, Dec 2 Public Poetry reading @ HPL Young Branch & Dec 14 Tintero & MFAH Around the Block reading!

December 2, 2017

A thank you to Janice Lee & Entropy for including ‘recombinant’ on this incredible list of Entropy‘s Best of 2017: Best Poetry Books & Poetry Collections list. 

Also, some upcoming readings!

Sat, December 2, 2p — Public Poetry Reading @ Houston Public Library, Young Branch (5107 Griggs Road) with Niki Herd, Erica Nicole, Henk Rossouw & Rj Wright

Thurs, December 14, 6-8p — Around the Block: A Night of Literary Voices @ Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Join the Museum of Fine Arts and Tintero Projects for a unique night of literary art!

Five Houston writers (Ching-In Chen, Corinna Delgado, Christopher Diaz, Icess Fernandez Rojas & Josh Inocéncio) present work inspired by the exhibition HOME—So Different, So Appealing. You’ll join the writers on a walk around the “neighborhoods” and “hogares” (homes) presented in the exhibition.

About Tintero Projects
Tintero Projects promotes writing and reading opportunities for emerging Latinx poets and writers of color in the Houston–Galveston/Gulf Coast Region, providing community through writing workshops, readings, collaborative art events, submission events, and a monthly reading series.

This program and access to the exhibion are free! On Thursdays, Museum admission is free, courtesy of Shell. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Related Program
Inspired by the exhibition “HOME—So Different, So Appealing” and community partner Tintero Projects, this collaboration brings another event, on December 7: Casa Mía: A Writing Workshop on “HOME.”

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

November 7, 2017

Houston-Based Feminist Poetics: National Women’s Conference, Nov 7, 2-3:30p

Bayou City Rm 219, Student Center South @ University of Houston

https://www.facebook.com/events/146587129303753/

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION:
To provide a chemical and fragrance free event, we request that participants not smoke before or during the event and to not wear colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event. Please read at the bottom for handicap accessibility information.

Roundtable-Reading on Houston-Based Feminist Poetics with Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz

In 1977, the year the IWY National Women’s Conference converged in Houston, Audre Lorde published her seminal essay “Poetry Is Not a Luxury,” in which she posits that poetry “forms the quality of light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action.” For Lorde, poems are the precursor to activism, “the spawning grounds for the most radical and daring of ideas.”

Forty year later, Houston is a uniquely fertile city for cross-pollination and conversation, especially in the arts and humanities, and particularly in our vibrant poetry communities. While painstaking progress has been made, the welfare of Texas women, nonbinary, and trans citizens are threatened by ongoing political tensions about “bathroom bills,” title IX, immigration, insurance, government grants, higher education curricula, and a dearth of diversity in the current federal administration.

This roundtable-reading reimagines the definition of civic engagement, establishing a place for the arts as a vital conduit for progressive policy, as imagined by Lorde. We’ll explore poetry’s thorny relationship with representation. To what extent does Houston’s position as a rapidly-developing Sunbelt city stand as a microcosm of problems of women, nonbinary, and trans citizens from around the world?

We’ll also discuss how women, nonbinary, and trans poets create long-lasting community. Which outreach strategies of outreach and organization are replicable in other cities? How are poets, both inside and outside the academy, perceived by society? How do they contribute to cross-cultural interactions that reconfigure the way people make meaning of the world?

Poets and activists Ching-In Chen, Jasminne Mendez, Deborah (D.E.E.P.) Mouton, and Leslie Contreras Schwartz exemplify “the spirit of Houston.” They produce literature with insight on several “planks” from the 1977 Women’s Conference–touching on topics such as domestic violence, disability and healthcare, gender expression, financial inequality, infertility and reproductive freedom–with a contemporary perspective on political regression and reaction, “survival and change.” In their poetry and poetics, these writers carry the torch of the landmark Women’s Conference in Houston, and shed new light on its complicated legacy.

ACCESSIBILITY:
An accessiblity ramp is located at the front entrance of Student Center South by the stairs. An elevator is located on the left after you enter the sliding doors. Nearest handicapped parking is across the street near Hilton or at the corner of Calhoun and University.

Thinking Its Presence: ‘Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form’ & ‘The Raced Pronoun’

October 20, 2017

Dear TIP-sters!

Here’s where I’ll be at TIP:

Friday, Oct 20, 2017:

2-3:50p Troubled Lineage & Genrequeer Form, Education North, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Shamala Gallagher, Larissa Lai, Trish Salah, Addie Tsai, moderated by Ching-In Chen)

What is the “ephemera of evidence” (or troubled lineages) from which we as trans/genderqueer/queer makers draw from? What is the relationship amongst experimental aesthetics, speculation and representation in relation to our built structures? How do we consider questions of tradition and belonging within this lineage? This innovative presentation (reading/performance/panel) gathers trans/genderqueer/queer writers/artists/performers/theorists to investigate the genrequeer or cross-genre form in QTPOC cultural production.

7p Thinking Its Presence Board Presents, Theater at Poetry Center, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Vidhu Aggarwal, Ching-In Chen, Lisa Jarrett, Farid Matuk, Lehua Taitano) – Join the TIP board as we share creative work & reflections!

Saturday, Oct 21, 2017:

11a-12:50p The Raced Pronoun, Poetry Center Classroom 205, University of Arizona Poetry Center (with Ching-In Chen, Jai Dulani, Soham Patel, Mg Roberts, Bishakh Som)

This panel is in response to the 2015 AWP panel entitled, “I Am We As You Are Me: Exploring Pronouns In Experimental Poetry,” where the question of whether pronouns are raced was discussed. This hybrid performance seeks to explore questions of intersections of race, diaspora, embodiment and language through Asian American responses to pronoun shifts and usage which evoke the bodily materiality of language and identity in multiple selves and contexts. What does it mean, as Sara Ahmed writes, to “live it” in everyday situations?

The Environment of the Classroom @ Center for Women Writers, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC

September 22, 2017

21765786_1440583909362887_261417008017333640_oThanks to Metta Sáma & Center for Women Writers for organizing this conversation on the environment of identity politics in the college classroom! Excited to talk teaching with Ailish HopperPrageeta SharmaErica Chu & Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs @ 1p, tomorrow/Friday @ Gramley Library, Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Hope to see you if you’re in the area!

Houston Brazos Bookstore Reading with Kimberly Alidio & John Pluecker, 7p, May 19!

May 19, 2017

Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant,’ Kimberly Alidio’s ‘after projects, the resound’ & John Pluecker’s ‘Ford Over’

Join us in celebrating the launch of Ching-In Chen’s new poetry collection, *recombinant* from Kelsey Street Press, alongside Kimberly Alidio’s *After projects the resound* from Black Radish and John Pluecker’s *Ford Over* from Noemi Press and a translation of Sara Uribe’s *Antígona González* from Les Figues Press.

KIMBERLY ALIDIO wrote *After projects the resound* (Black Radish, 2016) and *solitude being alien* (dancing girl press, 2013). She is the inaugural artist-in-residence at the Center for Art and Thought and a poetry fellow of Kundiman and VONA. She received fellowships from Naropa University’s Summer Writing Program and the University of Illinois’s Asian American Studies Program, as well as a doctorate in modern American history from the University of Michigan. A tenure-track dropout and high-school teacher, she hails from Baltimore and lives in East Austin, Texas.

CHING-IN CHEN is the author of *The Heart’s Traffic* (Arktoi Books) and *recombinant*(Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of *The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities* (South End Press; AK Press) and *Here is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets* (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities. A senior editor of *The Conversant,* they serve on the Executive Board of Thinking Its Presence: Race, Advocacy, and Solidarity in the Arts. They are an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and poetry editor of the *Texas Review.* www.chinginchen.com

JOHN PLUECKER is a writer, translator, interpreter, artist. He frequently collaborates with others, especially with artists, organizations and communities; one example is the language justice and literary experimentation collaborative Antena he co-founded with Jen Hofer in 2010. He has translated numerous books from the Spanish, including *Antígona González* (Les Figues Press, 2016) and *Tijuana Dreaming: Life and Art at the Global Border* (Duke University Press, 2012). His book of poetry and image, *Ford Over,* was released in 2016 from Noemi Press. He is a member of the Macondo Writing Workshop.

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Please note: BRAZOS BOOKSTORE has a wheelchair ramp and is wheelchair accessible. If you have other accessibility needs or need other accommodations, please call Brazos at (713) 523-0701.

book launch for ‘recombinant’ at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville today!

April 10, 2017

SHSU/Huntsville friendlies, hope you can join me for the Huntsville book launch for ‘recombinant’ today/Monday, 5:30p in Austin Hall! Thanks to SHSU CHSS Diversity & Inclusion Committee & SHSU LGBTQI* Faculty and Staff Network for co-sponsoring this event! This event is free and open to the public!

Here’s the Facebook event for more information:

recombinanthttps://www.facebook.com/events/1295381293871567/

Houston! “recombinant” reading and book signing

March 18, 2017

Saturday, March 18, 2017, 2-4p

MicroSpace Houston – 8119 Concho st, Houston, Texas 77036

Ching-In Chen will present a live reading of their newest book ‘recombinant’ along with a Q&A with the author, and a book signing. Copies of the book will be available for $15 (cash), $16.95 + tax (credit).

Donations for the artist and artspace graciously accepted. Concessions available for donation.

Please note: The venue has a few steps at the entryway and is not wheelchair accessible. If you have accessabilty needs please contact us and we will make accommodations. Microspacehouston@gmail.com

About ‘recombinant’:

Can a poetry seek to examine the erasure and reconstruction of a community history? Ching-In Chen’s ‘recombinant’ is a work of material critique, philosophically jarring in its use of syntax, sound, the erasures held in the stillness of its whitespace that again and again mimic a historical registry. Drafting and growing multiple discourses, this text urges the reader to investigate female and genderqueer lineages in the context of labor smuggling and trafficking. Its syntactical utterances create a music that is masterful in these poems’ fractured words and experimental representation of page and praxis. Voices from various communities interact with each other to create what Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan calls an assertion of diasporan realities where multi-directional, heterogeneous modes of representation challenge conventional representation via photographs; newspaper articles; maps; city directories; records of immigration, birth and death; as well as scholarly research and archaeological records. recombinant is a work of insistence, a refusal of erasure, a proof of shared memory through the rewriting and remixing of historical remnant.

Praise for ‘recombinant’:

The sweat of migrants, the starving bodies of impoverished workers, the they-children raised for export, the identification cards of the disobedient bodies with multiple names, the testimonies in interrogation rooms, the manufactured girl-bombs: the historical and linguistic presence, aliveness and residue of ancestral, immigrant lineages…in recombinant these entities are synthesized into brilliantly engineered narratives that chronicle the limits of what can be held at the borders we construct around our various identities, be they bodily, linguistic, national, occupational, familial, commercial….This is an intricate, careful, impression-making, impressive novel of a poem that necessarily exposes the secret testimonies and histories of the worlds among us that our larger world wishes us to never understand or see.

—Daniel Borzutzky

Promising “[n]o memory what I held in my mouth that bright morning,” Ching-In Chen’s recombinant undertakes the difficult work of witnessing without false promises of consolation or recognition. Accumulating and unsettling the cartographic records and rememorabilia of lives lived and lives lost to violence in this land that is always island, recombinant maps histories of Yellow Peril, race riots, and white slavery, the latter as imaginary alibi for the former, and opens out their interlock with and interlocution of anti-Black racisms, slaveries and lynchings and ongoing colonial genocides of Indigenous peoples.

How might a poem diagram destruction? What survives records or doesn’t, leaves traces, ledgers or ghosts’ marginalia? It is a bleak and beautiful summoning, one that discovers/inscribes a world anew in testifying to the destruction of this one.

—Trish Salah

Ching-In Chen’s recombinant is an innovative and powerful collection about genealogy, migration, survival, gender, memory, and ecology. The poems unearth and recombine fragments from museum artifacts, laws, census data, and historical archives with lyric reflections and open-heart composition strategies. By the end, you will feel haunted by the ghosts and ancestors who have continued their journey in the vessel of the poet’s tongue.

—Craig Santos Perez’

About Ching-In Chen:

‘Ching-In Chen is author of ‘The Heart’s Traffic’ (Arktoi Books/Red Hen Press) and ‘recombinant’ (Kelsey Street Press) and co-editor of ‘The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities’ (South End Press, AK Press) and ‘Here is A Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets’ (Achiote Press). A Kundiman, Lambda, Watering Hole and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of the Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities, and have been a participant in Sharon Bridgforth’s Theatrical Jazz Institute. They have also been awarded fellowships from Can Serrat, Millay Colony for the Arts, the Norman Mailer Center and Imagining America. Their work has appeared in ‘The Best American Experimental Writing,’ ‘The &NOW Awards 3: The Best Innovative Writing,’ and ‘Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.’ A senior editor of ‘The Conversant,’ they have also served on the Woodland Pattern board, Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission and as editor-in-chief of cream city review. They are currently an Assistant Professor in Poetry at Sam Houston State University and Poetry Editor of the Texas Review. http://www.chinginchen.com

https://www.facebook.com/events/254045115053423/