Archive for September, 2015

Failure to Identify Poetry Patio Party with María Miranda Maloney & new issues of The Conversant

September 5, 2015

Dear friendlies,

I finished my PhD! And moved to Houston, Texas to teach poetry and literature at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.  Lovelies and local artists/writers John Pluecker & Jorge Galván Flores are hosting a poetry patio party for myself and another writer newly moved to the area.  Info below.

And The Conversant is fully up and running after a summer hiatus.

Check out our most recent issues at http://www.theconversant.org/:

September’s issue of The Conversant is live! This month’s conversations include Freesia McKee with Anja Notanja Sieger & La Prosette on typewriting performance; Open House presents: Housten Donham with Fred Moten; Rosebud Ben-Oni with CantoMundo poets Diego Báez, Darrel Alejandro Holnes, J. Michael Martinez, Juan Morales and Octavio Quintanilla on {Power} Ballads; Andy Fitch with John Sakkis as part of an oral history of Nightboat Books; Mathew Timmons and Ben White’s The People with Troll Thread; Randall James Tyrone with Dan Beachy-Quick on his Essay Press book, A Quiet Book; That’s My Tattoo: a poetics conversation with Elisa Gabbert and Chris Tonelli, and Vernacular Visions: Brandon Freels with Justin Clifford Rhody.

August’s issue features conversations & interviews with Grace Shuyi Liew with Ginger Ko on feminist poetics, the poetry community’s sexism & Coconut Book’s recent hiatus; Laynie Browne & Julie Carr on their Essay Press chapbooks; The People’s Mathew Timmons & Ben White with Tom Comitta & Suzanne Stein; Rosebud Ben-Oni with JP Howard as part of Intersecting Lineages; Open House presents Madison Davis with Brittany Bill-Meyer Finn; Brandon Som with KAYA Press author Nicholas Wong; Jim Goar with Andre Baggoo; Andy Fitch with Nightboat author Daniel Borzutzky; Philip Metres with Stepan Brand; & Maria Anderson with Jennifer Kwon Dobbs on her Essay Press book.

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Failure to Identify Poetry Patio Party: María Miranda Maloney & Ching-In Chen

Saturday September 5, 2015
7:30pm
Back Patio of Jorge and JP’s House, Houston TX (since this is a private residence, I’m not going to publicly post their home address — but send an e-mail to chinginchen [at] gmail.com, if you’re interested in coming and don’t know the address)

María Miranda Maloney & Ching-In Chen have just moved to our beloved alligator-infested, petrochemical-infused, swampy Texas Gulf Coast bayoulands. The days are a little shorter, but the summer sun is still burning the banana leaves. Come out and meet María and Ching-In, welcome them to the area and hear their amazing poetry.

We’ll be with the philodendrons, the castor bean tree, and the aloe veras on the back patio of our home for this event. It’s BYOB. Feel free to bring a drink or a snack or an extra chair. Feel free to bring friends and invite other people, but it’s our house so make sure they’re sweet.

And we’d love if you’d stick around and chat and hang out afterward. Let’s have some fun together. Not another Houston art-and-run event. Pull up a chair and stick around a while.

More info on the poets:

Maria Miranda Maloney is the founder of Mouthfeel Press and author of The Lost Letters of Mileva. She is the educational outreach organizer for the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum. She is the current poetry editor for BorderSenses. Maloney has an MFA in Bilingual Creative Writing from UT El Paso.

Ching-In Chen (www.chinginchen.com) is author of The Heart’s Traffic and co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities. A Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow, they are part of Macondo and Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation writing communities, and have been a participant in Sharon Bridgforth’s Theatrical Jazz Institute. They are senior editor of The Conversant and have served on the Woodland Pattern board, Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission and as editor-in-chief of cream city review.

More info on the Failure to Identify Series (from JP):

This is the ninth event of an Occasional, Itinerant, Sporadic, Vagabond, Versatile, Irregular, Incidental, Intermittent, Roundabout, Accidental, Stray, Raro, Combustible series of arts & writing events. For the moment, the series is called Failure to Identify.

Since May 2012, I’ve been experimenting with creating spaces for innovative, interdisciplinary & risk-taking writers & artists to perform for Houston publics. Usually these events feature writers from out-of-town, though sometimes with local folks too. Sometimes the work pushes at the boundaries of the “reading” format. Since there is no institutional or academic funding (and I have no desire to institutionalize or non-profitize anything), the series has no fixed schedule and is super-occasional and super-dependent on happy coincidences and friendly, willing participants. Events have been held on the back patio of Kaboom Books or at other times in conjunction with local organizations like Art League, Project Row Houses, Fotofest and more. This will be the first time we have the party at home. Previous events have included:

May 2012: Let the Ponies Have Plenty of Room
June 2012: Jen Hofer & Javier Huerta
August 2012: Janice Lee & Anna Joy Springer
September 2012: TC Tolbert & Boston Davis Bostian
November 2012: Douglas Kearney
January 2013: Marco Antonio Huerta, Minerva Reynosa, Sara Uribe, and Lupe Méndez
March 2013: Rosebud Ben-Oni and Stalina Villarreal
March 2014: The Gender Book, Madsen Minax & CA Conrad

(Note to the note: As mentioned above, this series is now called Failure to Identify. It’s a crime in the U.S. to not identify yourself and it seems like somehow the work featured in this series has navigated the treacherous waters of (dis)identification, refusal and failure. The series was unnamed for a long time, but now I am liking this name more and more. It seems big and spacious and un-identifiable. In the past, I have given priority to just organizing the events, rather than naming what these events are. However, I have contemplated numerous names: Unzoned, Unnamed, As-Yet-Unnamed-But-Really-Quite-Lovely, before tentatively settling on this one: Failure to Identify.)

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