Posts Tagged ‘Timothy Yu’

{NYC] Process Talk at Asian American Writers’ Workshop: Jaswinder Bolina, Ching-In Chen, Bich Minh Nguyen, & Timothy Yu Tonight!

June 20, 2016

Monday, June 20, 7-9pm

Asian American Writers’ Workshop (110-112 W 27th Street, Suite 600)

Come through for our first installment of Process Talks—a salon-style multimedia show-n-tell—where innovative poets and novelists will screen the images that have been haunting their writing and discuss their writing process. We’re featuring award-winning poets Jaswinder Bolina, Ching-In Chen, Timothy Yu, and novelist Bich Minh Nguyen, all four of whom join us in a rare visit from out of town.

Poet Jaswinder Bolina is author of Phantom Camera (winner of the 2012 Green Rose Prize in Poetry from New Issues Press) and Carrier Wave (winner of the 2006 Colorado Prize for Poetry from the Center for Literary Publishing at Colorado State University). His work has been published in The Best American Poetry series, as well as The Poetry Foundation, The State, and Himal Southasian. He currently teaches on the faculty of the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing at the University of Miami.

A genderqueer, multi-genre writer Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart’s Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009). A Kundiman, Lambda, and Callaloo Fellow, they are a community organizer who has worked in Asian American communities in San Francisco, Oakland, Riverside and Boston, and co-organized the third national Asian Pacific American Spoken Word and Poetry Summit in Boston. Chen is also the co-editor of The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities (South End Press, 2011) and Here Is a Pen: an Anthology of West Coast Kundiman Poets (Achiote Press, 2009). Check out Hana Maruyama writing about Ching-In’s explorations of the zuihitsu in The Margins.

Director of the Asian American Studies Program at UW-Madison, Timothy Yu is the author of 100 Chinese Silences, the editor’s selection in the Les Figues Press NOS Book Contest, and of Race and the Avant-Garde: Experimental and Asian American Poetry since 1965 (Stanford), winner of the Book Award in Literary Studies from the Association for Asian American Studies. Check out two of his poems in The Margins.

Bich Minh Nguyen is the author of three books: Short Girls, a novel, which won an American Book Award winner in fiction and a Library Journal best book of the year; Stealing Buddha’s Dinner, a memoir, received the PEN/Jerard Award from the PEN American Center and was a Chicago Tribune Best Book of the Year, as well as a finalist for AAWW’s own Asian American Literary Award. Her newest novel is Pioneer Girl, a literary mystery about a second-generation Vietnamese daughter and her family and their ties to The Little House on the Prairie.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1721633431433050/

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Miami! Asian American Studies conference: Get Lit offsite reading + Asian American Poets Encounter the South

April 29, 2016

Dear lovelies,

I’ll be at the Association of Asian American Studies in Miami for these two events:

Get Lit in Miami!

Friday, April 29, 7-9p, The Cafe at Books and Books, Adrienne Arsht Center, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33132

You are cordially invited to an Association of Asian American Studies Conference offsite literary reading (with happy hour!), co-curated by Kundiman, Kaya, and the Asian American Literary Review.

Readers include: Cathy Linh Che, Ed Lin, Naomi Hirahara, Lawrence Minh-Bui Davis, Timothy Yu & Ching-In Chen

Note: There are several locations for Books & Books. This reading is at the location within a five-minute walk from the AAAS conference site.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1617836258541811/

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Sunday, April 30, 1:15-2:45p, Concierto Ballroom C

AAAS panel: Self-Articulation and Solidarity: Asian American Poets Encounter the South

Panelists: Vidhu Aggarwal, Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello, Ching-In Chen, Shamala Gallagher, Sarah Gambito

To live in the American South requires finding a way to understand oneself against a history of structural racial violence: to conceptualize oneself, implicitly or explicitly, in relation to the powerful black/white narrative of slavery, Jim Crow laws, and Civil Rights. Perhaps more than any other American region, the South is constituted in national and global cultural imaginaries by a story about race. In this story, Asian American subject positions are largely muted. To be an Asian American poet in the South, then, is to confront a master narrative in which one’s own subject position has no place; it is to insert oneself into this story as a rogue element, a destabilizing and complexifying force. Just as Asian Americans have been figured as outsiders in this country, the Asian American poetic utterance occurs at the margins of the Southern racial story, seeking to deepen and transform it from there.

In this formally hybrid panel—half poetry reading, half critical dialogue—the poets of Kundiman, an Asian American poetry collective, will speak to questions of what it could mean to be Asian American in the South. We will read poems that address Southern geographies—cultural, emotional, economic, ecological, visual—in order to offer visions toward a fuller and more nuanced understanding of Southern racial terrain. In this endeavor, we seek not to displace or downplay the intense realities of black Southern subjugation and liberation: instead, in claiming our presence in Southern space, we strive toward a self-articulation that is simultaneous with a multifaceted solidarity. Speaking from a multiplicity of Asian American subject positions, we will explore possibilities for connection with the heterogeneous communities of color living in the South—examining, for example, Asian American relationships to settler colonialism and indigenous rights as well as to questions of Latin American migration and border politics. In reaching across the critical/creative divide, this panel formally echoes the complicated and innovative work of boundary-crossing that Asian Americans must undertake in order to write ourselves into the Southern story.